I would like to hear how each candidate sees their business interest in counterparty being served by being in an elected position, and conversely, for those not in a Counterparty related business, how they see their position assisting non-business users


#1

Continuing the discussion from [Q&A] Counterparty Foundation Election 2016 Q&A:


#2

So, if I own a business, how will I serve my own interests? And, if I don’t own a business, how will I serve the interests of others? Seems like a weird way to chop up the question, but I’ll take a stab anyways…

I see the role of Community Directory largely as volunteering or doing community service in real life. It should be something you enjoy doing, you should expect very little out of it monetarily, but it should be rewarding work in its own right. And you’ll probably get some reputation and standing out of it, if you perform well.

I am a sole proprietor and make websites for a living, but Counterparty is not a business proposition for me really. It’s mostly my community, at this point. I like the people and the ideas and the discussions and the debates, and sometimes, I tinker with the protocol.

I’ve made some Counterparty related projects, like:

  • XCPDex.com (Devparty Submission - Relies heavily on CoinDaddy public development servers)
  • XCPfolio.com (Just a listing of the assets that I own.)
  • XCP.sx (Self-hosted enhanced asset info.)

But I wouldn’t consider any of these businesses. They’re just projects I’ve launched.

If I’m elected, I’ll probably do all the same things I do currently, but I’ll be “honor bound” to contribute more than usual to the community. That could include: improving XCP Dex further, creating media for would-be developers, hosting a Counterwallet, guest postings on domain blogs, or any number of things I feel are beneficial to the community at the time.

Would any of those things serve my business interests, I don’t know. I don’t think there’s a lot of money to be made here, to be honest. Not right now. Not today.

I think the benefit is just to be recognized a little more than usual in the community. There are a lot of big contributors who I think deserve some level of recognition for the time and energy they’ve imparted to the network, namely: J-Dog, but there are other people like Joe Looney, who are not running. But becoming a Community Director is not a vehicle for serving your own interests directly. It’s a reputation thing, IMO, and I trust some people act appropriately and others, not so much.


#3

“So, if I own a business, how will I serve my own interests? And, if I don’t own a business, how will I serve the interests of others? Seems like a weird way to chop up the question, but I’ll take a stab anyways…”

The question may have been awkward, however you addressed every aspect that I was looking for clarification on, so thanks.


#4

So, if I own a business, how will I serve my own interests?

I do own an operate a counterparty-related business CoinDaddy, llc. and the website coindaddy.io.

I DO NOT feel that the purpose of the Counterparty community director is to serve their own interest. The position is a COMMUNITY director, which to me means listening to the community and putting their best interests before any personal or company interests.


#5

I agree J-dog community director means community leader, maybe he’s best working with the community leader cabinet if that’s makes any sense to you all